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Business/Features

What’s up with Muskrat Falls ?

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When the Muskrat Falls operation started, it was a point of pride. A project on our own land, for the people by the people. It gave a big middle finger to the original Churchill Falls project, while also creating jobs and energy right here at home.

At the time we were covered in oil money. Newfoundlanders were bursting at the seams with “nationalism” – there was oil to be found in them there oceans, and we we riding its tail to the bank.

Whether or not, how we went about it was correct, we were pumped to be a “have” province. Bout time. We were due.

Politicians took advantage of this confidence, they recognized our giddiness and decided to use it for their own personal gain. It’s all about the vote. Once a politician makes it through the coveted Confederation doors, they are focused on remaining in office and all decisions are based on the upcoming election.

It was decided that we should be real pissed about the 1969 Quebec deal and fixing that mess should be the province’s top priority. We decided now that we have money, we should seek revenge and independence!

Though sticking it to Quebec was important, there were a lot of untouched issues in the province at the same time:

Rural communities had to travel to the capital and bigger towns for health care, without much financial support for those travels.

A shortage of doctors and nurses.

Public transport is only available in St. John’s.

Teachers are graduating without jobs.

At the time, the cost of living was surpassing a lot of residents income.

No set and secured plan for the aging population

No option to dial 911 in emergency.

….. but we could laugh in the face of Quebec. So there’s that.

Who needs more MRI machines when you have sweet vengeance ?

Although the plan was supposed to give us financial freedom and independence, as well as a lower electric bill- it’s truly not going as planned.

Between the investigation, the protests, the methylmercury levels, the North Spur- there’s a lot of information, concern and confusion.

We have to ask: what in the Jesus happened?

This month Tint of Ink will have a closer look at The Muskrat Falls project, through interviews, statistics, expert opinion, infographics, and op eds. A review of the unfortunate events and estimated future plans to help wrap our heads around what could be the island’s demise. 

There’s one thing we know for sure- it’s a mess. What  we ask now: how deep does that mess go, how scared should we be for our future and what can we expect from here on in.

 

 

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9415BC66-F45A-437E-9ABE-EBE4B5EABDE0
Business/Features

What’s up with Muskrat Falls ?

When the Muskrat Falls operation started, it was a point of pride. A project on our own land, for the people by the people. It gave a big middle finger to the original Churchill Falls project, while also creating jobs … Keep Reading

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